Vitamin C Skincare | Dermatologist Review

Vitamin C Skincare | Dermatologist Review

https://www.instagram.com/drdavinlim/
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Vitamin C or ascorbic acid is a member of skin actives – namely A, B, C and E. This skin care product is not for everyone. Most dermatologists will start you on Vitamin A or retinol, adding Vitamin B, then C as tolerated. Most skin care companies will have a Vitamin C product line ranging from 10%, all the way to 20%.

SKIN SCIENCE
Ascorbic acid has been shown to decrease pigmentation via inhibition of tyrosinase- the enzyme that produces melanin. Melanin accounts for the colour of skin. Ascorbic acid is also a free radical scavenger, decreasing UV induced ‘stressors’. Vitamin C is also a key vitamin in the synthesis of collagen.

TEXTURE / FEEL
The Ordinary makes a cosmetically elegant ascorbic acid cream/ lotion. Goes on easy, easily blended.

EASE OF USE
In the scheme of skin care, Vitamin C can sometimes be challenging to apply. The acidic nature of this vitamin is needed for better bioavailabity and absorption. Ideally the pH formulation should be 2-2.5 pH. What this means is that in patients with sensitive skin, irritation can occur- see below for caution.

CAUTION
Remember, vitamin A and C can be irritating in sensitive skin types including rosacea, dermatitis and allergy prone individuals. IMO Vitamin C should be the last ‘skin active’ in your routine. As always, if in doubt, test patch the product before applying to your face.

PACKAGING
The Ordinary ascorbic acid comes well packaged in a light proof air-tight tube. Protection from UV and air is essential for optimal biological effects.

PRICE
As always, The Ordinary comes in at a super competitive price.

FINAL THOUGHTS- Dr Davin S. Lim
IMO Vitamin C is the very last vitamin to add to your routine. The majority of my vitamin C prescriptions involve combining this active with other actives such as hydroquinone and or glycolic acid. In this context, vitamin C acts to stabilise the other actives and reduces oxidation. Once again, ascorbic acids should be used in caution if you have sensitive skin and or compromised epidermal barrier.

Thanks for viewing, more on skin care on my Instagram @drdavinlim
Dr Davin Lim
Cutis International
Brisbane, Australia.

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